State Rep Pushing for Higher SC Minimum Wage

minimum wage

By           Updated: February 10, 2016, 6:00 pm

COLUMBIA, S.C. – A state representative is fighting to raise the South Carolina’s minimum wage to $10.10/hour, and on Wednesday, she brought it to the Labor Commerce Committee at the Statehouse.

Rachel Nelson is a first-hand example why Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter created a bill to raise minimum wage. Nelson is a single mother from Charleston making $9/hour at Hardees, but she explains it’s not enough.

“As a single mom of three children, it is hard for me to provide for them just basic necessities,” she said. “I struggle each and every day.”

Nelson is calling state representatives to raise SC’s minimum wage, and pass Rep. Cobb-Hunter’s bill.

If passed, the bill will raise the state’s minimum wage nearly $3/hour from the current $7.25.

Nelson said, “This bill would be so wonderful for us, because it would be a stepping stone for us.”

“Let’s show families that we honor and respect them, by paying them a decent wage,” Cobb-Hunter said.

Several representatives are apprehensive to the idea of raising the minimum wage above the federal minimum. 29 states are currently above federal minimum.

Cobb-Hunter said, “There are a lot of people in the business community who are opposed to it because they think it will increase cost.”

She believes it won’t increase cost because if minimum wage is raised, taxpayers won’t have to pay for the social consequences on the back end of the issue. So she prefers to see that money go toward higher wages for people like Nelson to support their families.

“I may not have gone to college,” Nelson said, “But I feel this is what I deserve.”

 

gilda 8

Folks Representative Cobb Hunter prefiled H. 4400 during the 2014-2015 Legislative Session

 

H. 4400

STATUS INFORMATION

General Bill
Sponsors: Reps. Cobb-Hunter, M.S. McLeod, Dillard, R.L. Brown and Whipper
Document Path: l:\council\bills\agm\18055dg14.docx

Introduced in the House on January 14, 2014
Currently residing in the House Committee on Labor, Commerce and Industry

Summary: Minimum wage

HISTORY OF LEGISLATIVE ACTIONS

     Date      Body   Action Description with journal page number
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  12/10/2013  House   Prefiled
  12/10/2013  House   Referred to Committee on Labor, Commerce and Industry
   1/14/2014  House   Introduced and read first time (House Journal-page 61)
   1/14/2014  House   Referred to Committee on Labor, Commerce and Industry 
                        (House Journal-page 61)
    4/1/2014  House   Member(s) request name added as sponsor: R.L.Brown, 
                        Whipper



A BILL

TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING SECTION 41-10-35 SO AS TO PROVIDE THAT THE MINIMUM WAGE IN THIS STATE IS THE GREATER VALUE OF EITHER TEN DOLLARS OR THE MINIMUM WAGE SET BY THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT; TO AMEND SECTION 6-1-130, RELATING TO THE SCOPE OF AUTHORITY TO SET MINIMUM WAGE, SO AS TO PROVIDE THAT A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THIS STATE MAY NOT REQUIRE A MINIMUM WAGE THAT EXCEEDS THE ONE PROVIDED IN SECTION 41-10-35; TO AMEND SECTION 44-22-160, RELATING TO THERAPEUTIC PATIENT EMPLOYMENT, SO AS TO PROVIDE THAT A PATIENT EMPLOYEE MUST BE PAID THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVIDED IN SECTION 41-10-35; AND TO AMEND SECTIONS 53-1-100 AND 53-1-110, RELATING TO SUNDAY WORK IN MACHINE SHOPS AND SUNDAY WORK IN MANUFACTURING OR FINISHING OF TEXTILE PRODUCTS, RESPECTIVELY, BOTH SO AS TO PROVIDE THAT SUNDAY WORK MUST BE COMPENSATED AT A RATE NO LESS THAN THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVIDED IN SECTION 41-10-35.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina:

SECTION    1.    Chapter 10, Title 41 of the 1976 Code is amended by adding:

“Section 41-10-35.        An employer shall pay to an employee who performs any work, wages of at least ten dollars per hour or the minimum wage provided in Section 6 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, 29 U.S.C. 206, whichever is greater.”

SECTION    2.    Section 6-1-130(B) of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“(B)    A political subdivision of this State may not establish, mandate, or otherwise require a minimum wage rate that exceeds the federal minimum wage rate set forth in Section 6 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, 29 U.S.C. 206 Section 41-10-35. Also, a political subdivision of this State may not establish, mandate, or otherwise require a minimum wage rate related to employee wages that are exempt under 29 U.S.C. 201 et seq., the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.”

SECTION    3.    Section 44-22-160(A) of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“(A)    Each A patient may refuse nontherapeutic employment within the facility. The department shall establish policies and guidelines to determine what constitutes therapeutic employment. The record and justification of each a patient’s employment must be sent immediately to the attending physician for review and entered into the patient’s record. Patient employment must be compensated in accordance with the Fair Labor Standards Act, except that a patient employee shall receive no less than the minimum wage provided in Section 41-10-35.”

SECTION    4.    Section 53-1-100 of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“Section 53-3-100.    Notwithstanding any other another provision of law, the operation of machine shops and rubber molding and plastic injection molding facilities shall must be exempt from the provisions of this chapter. No person shall may be required to work on Sunday who is conscientiously opposed to Sunday work. If any person refuses to work on Sunday because of conscientious or physical objections, he shall does not jeopardize his seniority rights by such refusal or and may not be discriminated against in any manner. Sunday work shall must be compensated at a rate no less than that required by the Fair Labor Standards Act Section 41-10-35.”

SECTION    5.    Section 53-1-110 of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

“Section 53-1-110.    Notwithstanding any other another provision of law, the manufacture and finishing of textile products shall be are exempt from the provisions of Chapter 1, Title 53, as amended. Provided, however, that no person shall may be required to work on Sunday who is conscientiously opposed to Sunday work. If any a person refuses to work on Sunday because of conscientious or physical objections, he shall does not jeopardize his seniority rights by such refusal or and may not be discriminated against in any manner. Sunday work shall must be compensated at a rate no less than that required by the Fair Labor Standards Act Section 41-10-35.”

SECTION    6.    This act takes effect upon approval by the Governor.

 

Forty Six Blue Report will bring you Legislative updates on H. 4400

 

 

 

 

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